Darkness and Beauty in Literature

In the window, a crystal clear girl’s face, nearly transparent, was shown above silent moving mountains. In the window, “the figures… melted into a sort of symbolic world, not of this world.” Shimamura “felt his chest rise at the inexpressible beauty of it.” The book Snow Country's opening fully shows the beauty of mono, no awareness of anything but facts accumulated. Reflections on the window are so dreamy and fragile that they seem to be erased in a short breath of lights outside. The sadness is like the cold air there, undetectable from words, but was deeply planted in readers’ minds. However, there is also a strong tension of beauty weaved by nature and the beauty of a lady, intruding our most sensitive nerves.

I have been extremely passionate about Japanese literature for 5 years. Conflicts between darkness and beauty work like magic in unity. After reading One Hundred Years of Solitude, I have surprisingly found the same tension in a very distanced writing style. In Macondo, mans all have similar names, Arcadio, Buendía, Aureliano, and José, between which are hard to distinguish, just like their destinies, so identical that finally becomes an endless cycle. Nevertheless, the most sincere love, the strongest ambition, and the firmest support are created in the night sky. Although everything follows the prophecy that once said nothing will be remembered, after all, the book itself still paints us the glorious history. Once, also in the window, people saw “rain of tiny yellow flowers falling”. “They fell on the town all through the night in a silent storm, and they covered the roofs and blocked the doors and smothered the animals who slept outdoors.” Suffocating despair is covered with joy and beauty—the only thing remaining in the shade of youthful yellow. The idea of darkness and beauty in both books is born in a profound knowledge seeing through the pattern of all the developments of human lives yet appreciating residuals of loveliness.

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NightTide

NightTide

A girl exploring the world, a sunflower lover